March 2010, Volume 21 Number 1 Search All Oracle Editions

In This Issue


It is my great pleasure to provide you with highlights of our annual results. 2009 was a great year for OSBIE and we are very proud of the results achieve

On behalf of the Board of Directors I am pleased to report to you on the results of OSBIE’s 23rd year of operation. Our school board-owned and directed organization had a very successful 2009.

Over the past few years the Oracle has featured articles discussing the injury hazards associated with microwaves in classrooms and televisions mounted on A/V carts.

OSBIE would like to extend a warm welcome to our newest members in the Joint Venture Program.

On February 1, 2010, the Ontario Provincial Government’s “Keeping Our Kids Safe at School Act” became effective. The legislation, which stems from the Safe Schools Action Team report, is intended to make schools safer and help students achieve their full potential by:

OSBIE Incident Reports should be completed when a personal injury occurs on the Boards’ premises or when the third party is injured while in the Boards’ care. A third party is defined as anyone other than an employee (NOTE: an employee would report their injury to the WSIB).

With spring just around the corner OSBIE has received additional stock of our popular Playing It Safe Guidebook.

How a building is designed and the materials it is constructed from can not only make it last longer, but can also result in a safer building that resists loss from the most common perils – fire and windstorm.

The OSBIE Board of Directors held its first meeting of2010 on February 19, 2010.


The first of three instalments of our Risk Management Web Series will take place Thursday April 22, 2010 at 2 pm.

About 20 years ago, in recognition of legal rulings that prevailed at that time, OSBIE adopted the position that school boards should not use waivers or release/hold harmless forms for students under 18 years of age for parents/ guardians to sign as a means of relieving legal liability.

Employers might be held vicariously liable if they permit employees to use hand-held devices while driving, warns Zurich North America.

The H.E.L.P. audits are well on their way and I am pleased to report that they have been going very well.